Ama-no-hashidate view of Sesshū Tōyō

Ama-no-hashidate view of Sesshū Tōyō


         The painting of Ama-no-hashidate view belongs to Japanese painter Sesshū Tōyō, around the XV century. This painter is one of the masters of Japanese painting. This masterpiece depicts a bird's eye view of one of the Three Views of Japan. It is painted with wet ink with smooth and precise brush strokes. Sesshū painted it when he was about eighty years old, and went up the mountain to paint it. It is declared a National Treasure of Japan.
Sesshū Tōyō is one of the great masters of Japanese painting. Born into a prominent family of samurai, was educated to become a Zen Buddhist monk, which he did at age of 11. But what really stood out from the child was in painting, taking classes with Tenshō Shūbun (who had been a pupil of the great Taikō Josetsu). He also traveled to China for two years, where he came into contact with the great Chinese landscape painters of his time. His popularity, still alive, was enormous.
It belongs to the Muromachi Period, of 1392-1573, in the Medieval Period. During this period, the shōgunate was held by the Ashikaga, whose infighting favored the growing power of the daimyō, who divided the territory. Flourishes significantly the painting, framed within the Zen aesthetic. The gouache technique is imposed, which aims to reflect on what the landscapes mean, not what they represent.
  

           Something that caught my attention from Chinese and Japanese painting is the use of ink. They get some impressive effects with it that has never been seen in Europe. If it is also a landscape painting, for me it's great.
It is located in the National Museum in Kyoto, Japan.

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