Krishna and Rādhā

Krishna and Rādhā
  

Krishna and Rādhā is a painting of around 1770 of the the Bilāspur style. To analyze this Indian painting I will go step by step. In general terms, it is a colorful painting, colors generally flat, with very little shading. In the center are Krishna and Rādhā. The blue man is Krishna, which, according to Hinduism, is one of the avatars of Vishnú, or as the Krishnaism, would be the same God. It is one of the most important and worshiped gods of India. The left woman taking her to his wrist is Rādhā, his wife.
On the left are the Gopī pastors or the cowherd pastors. In fact, you can see animals, sheeps. They are recognized for their devotion to Krishna. In the right side are the shepherds Gopá.
In India, the civilization began in the mid-III millennium before Christ, in the area of ​​the Indus river basin, where perhaps there were Sumerian influences. From 1500 before Christ came the invasion of the Hindus, people of Indo-Aryan language, of whose merger with the existing population in India is born the Hindu civilization.


          The truth is that I have been amazed with this painting. I did not know it, it has been a discovery making this commentary. It's an amazing painting, a masterpiece of Indian painting. I do not know why, but reminded me to the Allegory of Spring of Botticelli.
It is located in the Indian Museum of Calcutta, India.

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