Departure of the Witches by Luis Ricardo Falero

Departure of the Witches by Luis Ricardo Falero
  

            This painting actually has no name, so it has received numerous names. The Departure of the Witches, Witches going to their Sabbath, or the Vision of Faust are some of the names you can find of this painting. It belongs to the Spanish Romantic painter Luis Ricardo Falero, which although within romanticism, rather late romanticism, his subjects are naked, mythology and fantasy. He has naked in almost all his paintings.
The painting is dark, and naked bodies create some contrast with the background. You can see naked women, old women, a man and even skeletons, bats, a goat, and strange beings. Looks like a great festival of death, hence the name Vision of Faust, which in the work of Goethe sells his soul to the Devil. The name Witches is probably because women seem witches by being in this deadly scenario. The Witches' Sabbath is the meeting of those who do sorcery and other rites.
  

            Luis Ricardo Falero was a spanish painter of XIX century. He specialized in female nudes and mythological, oriental and fantasy settings.[1] Most of his paintings contained at least one nude or topless female.
The Romanticism breaks with the neoclassical and appears the figure of a new individual who seeks balance between reason and sentiment. It goes roughly from the mid-XVIII century to the mid-XIX century. Romanticism offers a new vision where man feels tiny to the immeasurable nature. The Germans called this movement as the Sturm und Drang (Storm and Impetus).
Romantic painting is characterized by its fluid contours, for the compositions without apparent order and color richness. The painters of the Romantic imagination was drawn to the Middle Age and the legends of the North.
  

            In conclusion, it is a spectacular painting. When I found out, I wanted to comment it, and thus I also always remember. A very interesting masterpiece.
            I do not know where to find this painting, but I think it is in a private collection.

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